libutron:

Ammonite fossil | ©National Museum Wales 
This ammonite, Sphenodiscus lenticularis (Cephalopoda - Ammonoidea- Sphenodiscidae), lived about 70 million years ago, just before ammonites, together with the dinosaurs, became extinct. When this one was preserved, the shell was naturally replaced by minerals, giving an iridescent sheen. 

libutron:

Ammonite fossil | ©National Museum Wales 

This ammonite, Sphenodiscus lenticularis (Cephalopoda - Ammonoidea- Sphenodiscidae), lived about 70 million years ago, just before ammonites, together with the dinosaurs, became extinct. When this one was preserved, the shell was naturally replaced by minerals, giving an iridescent sheen. 

ohdarlingdankeschoen:

Thetis Dipping Achilles in the River Styx - Thomas Banks, 1790 (by Kotomi_)  the sea nymph Thetis dips her son Achilles in the Styx, the river of the underworld. In this way, Thetis wanted to make her son immortal, after an oracle had told her that he would die young in battle. While she dipped him in the water, she held on to him by his foot. Because of this, this area, the proverbial Achilles heel, proved his vulnerable spot. He would ultimately be killed by a poisoned arrow entering his heel.

ohdarlingdankeschoen:

Thetis Dipping Achilles in the River Styx - Thomas Banks, 1790 (by Kotomi_)  the sea nymph Thetis dips her son Achilles in the Styx, the river of the underworld. In this way, Thetis wanted to make her son immortal, after an oracle had told her that he would die young in battle. While she dipped him in the water, she held on to him by his foot. Because of this, this area, the proverbial Achilles heel, proved his vulnerable spot. He would ultimately be killed by a poisoned arrow entering his heel.

(via architecture-and-culture)

heavyarethecrowns:

Grand Duchess Olga, Russia

heavyarethecrowns:

Grand Duchess Olga, Russia

(via royalrumormonger)

heavyarethecrowns:

Grand Duchess Olga, Russia

heavyarethecrowns:

Grand Duchess Olga, Russia

(via architecture-and-culture)

abystle:

Ship in a Coastal Landscape, Peder Balke, N.d.

abystle:

Ship in a Coastal Landscape, Peder Balke, N.d.

(Source: hypnoticlandscape, via sommartidsvarmod)

tolteka:

oil on canvas, Art by Ricardo Ortega

(via post-impressionisms)

formascriticas:

→ House of the Infinite por Alberto Campo Baeza. ©Javier Callejas

Esta habitação em Cádiz, Espanha, desenhada pelo arquiteto espanhol Alberto Campo Baeza, é surreal… Em primeiro lugar, porque está inserida num cenário fantástico. Quem não gostaria de ter uma casa em frente ao mar, mesmo em cima da areia? Pois.

Em segundo lugar, porque tudo parece perfeito! Acompanhem o meu raciocínio. O desenho minimalista, a piscina na cobertura, a mármore que reveste todo o volume, as caixilharias invisíveis, as pequenas clarabóias que iluminam o interior e as plantas de desenho ortogonal, que podem ser vistas aqui, são alguns dos pormenores que me chamaram a atenção e que com certeza farão deste volume, um clássico da arquitetura contemporânea. 

Ah..! E o pórtico da entrada? Viram? Enfim… são tantos details que o melhor é mesmo fazer um clique aqui e ficarem a conhecer tudo ao pormenor. Take a look!

"You see, there are still faint glimmers of civilization left in this barbaric slaughterhouse that was once known as humanity. Indeed that’s what we provide in our own modest, humble, insignificant… oh, fuck it."

(Source: louisecolleman, via tirairgid)

medicalschool:

References to hydrocephalic skulls can be found in ancient Egyptian medical literature from 2500 BC to 500 AD. Hydrocephalus was described more clearly by the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates in the 4th century BC, while a more accurate description was later given by the Roman physician Galen in the 2nd century AD. The first clinical description of an operative procedure for hydrocephalus appears in the Al-Tasrif (1000 AD) by the Arab surgeon, Abulcasis, who clearly described the evacuation of superficial intracranial fluid in hydrocephalic children. He described it in his chapter on neurosurgical disease, describing infantile hydrocephalus as being caused by mechanical compression. He states:

“The skull of a newborn baby is often full of liquid, either because the matron has compressed it excessively or for other, unknown reasons. The volume of the skull then increases daily, so that the bones of the skull fail to close. In this case, we must open the middle of the skull in three places, make the liquid flow out, then close the wound and tighten the skull with a bandage.”

In 1881, a few years after the landmark study of Retzius and Key, Carl Wernicke pioneered sterile ventricular puncture and external CSF drainage for the treatment of hydrocephalus. It remained an intractable condition until the 20th century, when shunts and other neurosurgical treatment modalities were developed. It is a lesser-known medical condition; relatively small amounts of research are conducted to improve treatments for hydrocephalus, and to this day there remains no cure for the condition. In developing countries, it is common that this condition go untreated at birth. It is difficult to diagnose during ante-natal care and access to medical treatment is limited. However, when head swelling is prominent, children are taken at great expense for treatment. By then, brain tissue is undeveloped and neurosurgery is rare and difficult.

medicalschool:

References to hydrocephalic skulls can be found in ancient Egyptian medical literature from 2500 BC to 500 AD. Hydrocephalus was described more clearly by the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates in the 4th century BC, while a more accurate description was later given by the Roman physician Galen in the 2nd century AD. The first clinical description of an operative procedure for hydrocephalus appears in the Al-Tasrif (1000 AD) by the Arab surgeon, Abulcasis, who clearly described the evacuation of superficial intracranial fluid in hydrocephalic children. He described it in his chapter on neurosurgical disease, describing infantile hydrocephalus as being caused by mechanical compression. He states:

“The skull of a newborn baby is often full of liquid, either because the matron has compressed it excessively or for other, unknown reasons. The volume of the skull then increases daily, so that the bones of the skull fail to close. In this case, we must open the middle of the skull in three places, make the liquid flow out, then close the wound and tighten the skull with a bandage.”

In 1881, a few years after the landmark study of Retzius and Key, Carl Wernicke pioneered sterile ventricular puncture and external CSF drainage for the treatment of hydrocephalus. It remained an intractable condition until the 20th century, when shunts and other neurosurgical treatment modalities were developed. It is a lesser-known medical condition; relatively small amounts of research are conducted to improve treatments for hydrocephalus, and to this day there remains no cure for the condition. In developing countries, it is common that this condition go untreated at birth. It is difficult to diagnose during ante-natal care and access to medical treatment is limited. However, when head swelling is prominent, children are taken at great expense for treatment. By then, brain tissue is undeveloped and neurosurgery is rare and difficult.

wapiti3:

A history of the earth and animated nature. By Oliver Goldsmith. on Flickr.
Publication info Glasgow [etc.]Blackie and son[1840] Contributing Library: University of California Libraries  BioDiv. Library

wapiti3:

A history of the earth and animated nature. By Oliver Goldsmith. on Flickr.

Publication info Glasgow [etc.]Blackie and son[1840]
Contributing Library:
University of California Libraries
BioDiv. Library

(via scientificillustration)