houghtonlib:

Tagliacozzi, Gaspare, 1545-1599. De curtorum chirurgia per insitionem, 1599.

Typ 525.97.820

Houghton Library, Harvard University

16th century surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi was particularly known for his skill in the method of reconstructing an amputated nose by grafting a flap of skin from the patient’s arm. The patient would have to spend three weeks with the arm immobilized in this position for the graft to take.

(via scientificillustration)

themagicfarawayttree:

Boladora - After John White, Date 1585-1593 (via British Museum)

themagicfarawayttree:

Boladora - After John White, Date 1585-1593 (via British Museum)

aeruh-aoi:

 Ilya Repin

(via lord-kitschener)

ravenhauntedforests:

Willy Kriegel “Nacht” 1943

ravenhauntedforests:

Willy Kriegel “Nacht” 1943

(Source: drittenreichkunst, via lord-kitschener)

radiologysigns:

What are the injuries and what classic sign is seen?
ANSWER: http://goo.gl/B0LuUh

radiologysigns:

What are the injuries and what classic sign is seen?

ANSWER: http://goo.gl/B0LuUh

lonequixote:

Self Portrait ~ Jean-Michel Basquiat
spaceexp:

Sunset over Gale Crater.

spaceexp:

Sunset over Gale Crater.

orbiculator:

Fossil specimen of Seirocrinus subangularis from Houston Museum, Texas. Seirocrinus is a stalked crinoid or a sea lily, cousins of sea stars that are still alive today in our oceans, although they are often limited to greater depths. However, Seirocrinus along with a few other genera, are an interesting case: it grows on floating logs, and it may reach up to 20 meters in total length. These pseudoplanktonic crinoids are most abundant in Jurassic seas, and seem to fill a niche no longer seen in most marine animals, save perhaps the tiny goose barnacles (Lepas, Dosima), which float on the ocean’s surface through a similar strategy. One can only imagine what an interesting sight it must have been. Gigantic flower-like creatures, growing on logs, with stems tall as most trees. Floating just beneath the water’s surface, with ammonoids, fish and ichthyosaurs swarming around it, just as sargassum mats today attract vagrant fauna. Further ReadingImage Source

orbiculator:

Fossil specimen of Seirocrinus subangularis from Houston Museum, Texas. Seirocrinus is a stalked crinoid or a sea lily, cousins of sea stars that are still alive today in our oceans, although they are often limited to greater depths.

However, Seirocrinus along with a few other genera, are an interesting case: it grows on floating logs, and it may reach up to 20 meters in total length. These pseudoplanktonic crinoids are most abundant in Jurassic seas, and seem to fill a niche no longer seen in most marine animals, save perhaps the tiny goose barnacles (Lepas, Dosima), which float on the ocean’s surface through a similar strategy.

One can only imagine what an interesting sight it must have been. Gigantic flower-like creatures, growing on logs, with stems tall as most trees. Floating just beneath the water’s surface, with ammonoids, fish and ichthyosaurs swarming around it, just as sargassum mats today attract vagrant fauna.

Further Reading
Image Source

lonequixote:

The Rock Needle Seen through the Porte d’Aval ~ Claude Monet

lonequixote:

The Rock Needle Seen through the Porte d’Aval Claude Monet

(via theartgeeks)