arcadiainteriorana:

Meadow RoadJ.R. Peterson
Carbon Print, 23.5 x 18.5 cm, 1906.

arcadiainteriorana:

Meadow Road
J.R. Peterson

Carbon Print, 23.5 x 18.5 cm, 1906.

(via sommartidsvarmod)

smithsonianlibraries:

Dutch mathematician,astronomer, physicist, and inventor of the pendulum clock, Christiaan Huygens was born TDIH 1629.
Check out his Systema Saturnium where he describes the rings of Saturn and discovers Titan, and the Orion nebula.

smithsonianlibraries:

Dutch mathematician,astronomer, physicist, and inventor of the pendulum clock, Christiaan Huygens was born TDIH 1629.

Check out his Systema Saturnium where he describes the rings of Saturn and discovers Titan, and the Orion nebula.

scienceisbeauty:

Beyond stupid superstitions, check this video out to learn what a lunar eclipse is. More at Nasa Science News, A Tetrad of Lunar Eclipses, and NASA Lunar Eclipse Page.

(via spaceexp)

jtotheizzoe:

okkultmotionpictures:

EXCERPTS  >|< Your Body During Adolescence (1955)

A video from Prelinger Archive.

A series of gifs excerpted from Your Body During Adolescence. Shows the seven glands that regulate human life and growth with emphasis on the pituitary and sex glands. Outlines changes that take place in the bodies of boys and girls.

Do you really know your body? From the age of 12-15, you’re basically just a rapidly expanding bag of glands (according to this video, anyway, which you can watch in full below):

Yes, it’s a funny look back in time. But sadly, 60 years later, this is still how many young people are introduced to sexual education, with sex only spoken about as a way to make babies, and adolescence only serving as a stepping stone to life as a responsible, working adult (who, of course, wants to get married and make babies). Adolescence is perhaps the most crucial period of a person’s life, in which you experiment and question and discover and change all sorts of things about your mind and body. Yes, in the end you become an adult, but instead of the mythical and somber suit/tie/apron/job/baby definition put forth in these antiquated videos, you should consider being an adult as becoming just a slightly older person who experiments and questions and discovers and changes all sorts of things about their mind and body.

For a look at how sex ed should be done, you really should be watching the Sexpalantions channel with Dr. Doe on YouTube!! Appropriately, here is her video “Sex is Not Black and White”:

spacetravelco:

Scientific engravings from 1850

by John Philipps Emslie

(via the Wellcome Collection)

(via biomedicalephemera)

dipot:

William-Adolphe Bouguereau: Souvenir, 1894.

dipot:

William-Adolphe Bouguereau: Souvenir, 1894.

(Source: 23silence, via jaded-mandarin)

i-love-art:

Gustav Klimt - Danae

i-love-art:

Gustav Klimt - Danae

(Source: daldandala, via thevictorianduchess)

skeptv:

A Week in Science - Beer- an ancient biotechnology

The world’s first beer brewers were also the world’s first biotechnologists! Find out about the origins of beer and scientific differences between Ales and Lagers.

You can follow A Week in Science throughout the week on Twitter, and join the discussion, by following @RiAus

For more information visit http://riaus.org.au/podcast/a-week-in-science-4-april-2014/

via RiAus.

jtotheizzoe:

sciencesoup:

Living Fossils

Located in Hamelin’s Pool, a shallow area of Shark Bay in Western Australia, these odd formations aren’t rocks—they’re stromatolites, and they were built over millennia by single-celled cyanobacteria (also known as blue-green algae). 4,000 to 6,000 years ago, a huge bank of seagrass began to block the tidal flow into Hamelin’s Pool, which meant that the water became twice as salty as the open ocean. Animals like snails and chitons that would usually feed on the algae couldn’t survive, so the blue-green algae began to flourish. Gathered in colonies, they trapped sediment with their sticky surface coatings. This sediment reacted with calcium carbonate in the water and formed limestone, essentially creating a living fossil—this limestone is alive, its top surface layer teeming with active cyanobacteria. The limestone builds up slowly at a rate of about 1mm per year. The stromatolites in Shark Bay are estimated to be between 3,000 and 2,000 years old, but they’re similar to life forms in Precambrian times, 3.5 billion years ago, at the dawn of complex organisms. There are over 50 kinds of cyanobacteria in Shark Bay, and one is thought to have descended from an organism that lived nearly 2 million years ago, making it a part of one of the longest biological lineages.

(Image Credit: 1, 2)

I normally abhor the term “living fossil” but I’ll let it slide this time because AWESOME. Like little prokaryotic time capsules.